Travel Inspiration By A Pro Trip Designer

MOONCAKE MAKING

Asia, Food + Wine

Sep
11
2009

HONG KONG

September 11th, 2009

Mooncakes are a traditional Chinese pastry made for the Mid-Autumn Festival and are meant to be eaten outside, under the moon. They come in all types of varieties and are generally a tad dense for the western palette being that they’re made with duck egg yolk.  Haagen Dazs though has rolled out an ice-cream version which was a top-seller in China and Starbucks has its own coffee flavor. They are considered a delicacy and stamped with chinese characters for longevity.  Over 250,000 mooncakes were sold during the festival last year – even one of pure gold.

On my press trip to Shangri-La Kowloon, we made a batch of our own with black truffles. Here are some pics.

Our guide, chef-of-little-words, showed us by demonstration

Our guide, chef-of-little-words, showed us by demonstration

We got chef costumes too

We got chef costumes too

The ingredients and tools - dough, bowls, egg yolk paste and flower

The ingredients and tools – dough, bowls, shape maker bats (clearly I have no idea the real name for that) egg yolk baste and flour

It was really quite fun -especially the shape making part where we had to bang the paddle on the side of the counter.  The character on top means longevity, er, I think.

Right before the oven

Right before the oven

Our impressive collection

Our impressive collection

Sadly I never did get to taste the finished product but I was told they were quite strong. I’m pretty sure making them is the best part anyway. However, I may indeed try an ice-cream one later. I’ll let you know.

Posted in: Asia, Food + Wine

Published by Meg, Friday, September 11, 2009 No Comments

THE PEAK

Asia, Travel Tips

Sep
11
2009

HONG KONG

September 10th, 2009

The view of the city from the top of the Peak Funicular. A tad hazy but impressive nonetheless

The view of the city from the top of the Peak Funicular. A tad hazy but impressive nonetheless

As fitting of a tourist, I went up to the top of the Peak Tram to check out one of the city’s best views. Leaving from about mid-peak level, the surprisingly steep tram is an easy 10 minute ride up to the summit of the peak. Its not the actual top – that’s the view you have to shell out for – where all the uber wealthy in HK dwell.

requisite shot

requisite shot

The next pic details one of the biggest takeaways from the city – the competition for height. Among the sea of skinny skyscrapers, two waldos stand out; The IFC where the Four Seasons and a whole host of fancy label shops live and the not-yet-finished ICC. Located right across the water in west Kowloon, the 116-floor ICC promises to be the tallest building in Hong Kong at 1587.9 feet.

INSERT HERE: All the male-related comments I'm too proper to put online

INSERT HERE: All the male-related comments I'm too proper to put online

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Posted in: Asia, Travel Tips

Published by Meg, Friday, September 11, 2009 No Comments

about meg

About Meg

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Meg is the founder of luxury travel consulting company, Friend of a Friend Consulting. Her three books, Italian Hideaways, Caribbean Hideaways and England's Hideaways are published by Rizzoli. Passionate about travel, hotels and wine, she continues to write freelance travel pieces and is currently pursuing a Masters in Wine through the WSET.

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The opinions expressed on this blog are solely my own and do not reflect separate business relationships with the subject. Whenever posts are supported financially, they are designated as such.